Obsession

If there’s one thing that you can pretty much define as a British obsession it’s the weather. It’s a stereotype, but it’s also oh so very true… Lock a group of us in the lift and you can guarantee a weather comment will be a conversation opener.

We all know when something ‘big’ is heading our way and talk about it constantly in anticipation, during the event and for weeks (if not years) afterwards – whether it be flooding, heatwaves or snow.

Snow is a big favourite. Nothing like snow for utter CHAOS to be generated. (And that word is always in capitals.) Chaos, gridlock, standstill, big freeze…plus, lots of photos of cute children enjoying snow days. We adore it. No wonder ‘uksnow’ has been one of Twitter’s top ranking #tags over the last 48 hours. Only in Britain would people fall over themselves to document the movement of precipitation over the country…

I love a good bit of snow. February 2nd 2009 still ranks as one of my all-time favourite days – ever. But this particular ‘big freeze’ has been going on for ages, the first snow fell December 16th and I think it’s snowed somewhere in the UK every day since. I don’t like walking on ice (I’m paranoid about falling and breaking something, one of my good friends already has) and I’m not overly keen on having to remember layer after layer of clothing. Plus, this weekend is Girls Weekend #3 – eagerly anticipated since we booked it in August – and I don’t want people to miss out. Oh, and I have no camera to document it….and I need to get in to work tomorrow because my new bank cards are being delivered…rah.

But, this is all just a tad selfish. I’ve been chilly in my flat, resorting to the heating, hot water bottles, sleeping in a hoodie, wearing my ‘very cold weather’ coat and eating lots of winter comfort food. At least I have a flat, money for heating and a variety of clothes to wear according to temperature. A lot of people aren’t so lucky. I sat on a bus for 45mins instead of the usual 10, but at least I made it home safely.

As a nation, we are obsessed, but I can’t help feeling it’s a selfish obsession. We want to know what the weather’s going to be like for own benefit – if it’s going to be hot for that party, or wet for that cricket match or snow so we can have a day of work… Maybe we should spend a little more time thinking about its wider repercussions?

Comments

  1. “Nothing like snow for utter CHAOS to be generated. (And that word is always in capitals.) Chaos….”

    Oh the irony!

  2. Ahhhh, got to love it when pedantry comes back to haunt me!!

    Excellent observation.

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